Award shows. We know them, we love them. But do we watch them?

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Award shows. We know them, we love them. But do we watch them?

Savana Olivas '18

Savana Olivas '18

Savana Olivas '18

Abbey Alexander, Writer

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Last Sunday, TV’s all across the country were graced with the exciting chaos that is also known as the VMAs. The MTV Video Music Awards are a particularly fun show to watch, with daring fashion choices and shocking performances.

This year was nothing short of spectacular and the internet is still buzzing.

Did you happen to miss the show? Whether you had soccer practice, were drowning in homework that you’d avoided until 7 p.m. on a Sunday night or you just weren’t that interested, you’re not alone.
According to the New York Times, this year’s ratings, “plummeted, drawing an audience of 6.5 million viewers, about a 34 percent drop from last year’s total of 9.8 million.”

Am I surprised? Not exactly. I don’t blame people for skipping out on watching it; why take the time to sit down and watch hours of TV when you can just wait for all the news to flood on to the internet? Open Twitter the day after any award show, and immediately you’ll see pictures of best dressed, worst dressed and everything in between. We all remember the “Miley, what’s good?” incident from last year’s VMAs, and that’s exactly the kind of news that people really care about. Quite frankly, few people are really wondering who won “Best Editing” or “Best Cinematography” for their music videos. (By the way, Beyonce’s “Formation” won for both these categories).
This year, the show was relatively mild in comparison to previous years. A couple Ryan Lochte jokes by Jimmy Fallon, Drake professing his love for Rihanna and Beyoncee blowing away the crowd with her incredible performance were the major highlights. But again, no one needed to watch the actual show to hear about these things.

As for the red-carpet (actually, the VMAs have a white carpet every year), some people argue that it’s the best part of any award show. It’s glamorous, it’s fun and watching it almost makes you feel like you’re there with the celebrities.

The best part of the red carpet, of course, is the fashion, which there is no shortage of online. Pictures of the fierce gymnasts of U.S.’s Olympic “Final Five” in fun and youthful dresses, Beyonce sporting an icy blue get-up and Britney Spears in a little black dress all appeared Sunday night on Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and Tumblr.

Basically, the VMAs broke the internet, but they didn’t break any rating records.

So will award shows stick around for much longer, or will social media prevail?

 

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