Ways to Eat Healthy this Thanksgiving Season

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Ways to Eat Healthy this Thanksgiving Season

Junior Caroline Hink spent Friendsgiving with her friends on Nov. 16 and captured a picture of a friend’s plate. This is one version of a healthy Thanksgiving meal. Photo courtesy of Caroline Hink ‘20.

Junior Caroline Hink spent Friendsgiving with her friends on Nov. 16 and captured a picture of a friend’s plate. This is one version of a healthy Thanksgiving meal. Photo courtesy of Caroline Hink ‘20.

Junior Caroline Hink spent Friendsgiving with her friends on Nov. 16 and captured a picture of a friend’s plate. This is one version of a healthy Thanksgiving meal. Photo courtesy of Caroline Hink ‘20.

Junior Caroline Hink spent Friendsgiving with her friends on Nov. 16 and captured a picture of a friend’s plate. This is one version of a healthy Thanksgiving meal. Photo courtesy of Caroline Hink ‘20.

Caroline Hink, Class Writer

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During the Holiday season, many Americans are tempted by the delicious, calorie-packed dishes that make their way to the dinner table. Thanksgiving favorites like mashed potatoes, stuffing, and pumpkin pie are hard to pass up and over-indulgence happens without even thinking. Surveys from the New York Times report that the average American gains anywhere from five to ten pounds between Thanksgiving and New Years’, but there are many simple things you can change in your diet to combat this weight gain.

 

Who does not love a big pile of mashed potatoes on their plate at Thanksgiving? While potatoes surely please taste buds, they are also high in carbohydrates and when made with butter and whole milk, a single serving can be over three hundred calories. To make healthier mashed potatoes, try substituting white potatoes for sweet potatoes or even mashed cauliflower. If you cannot give up the taste of traditional mashed potatoes, portion control is another easy way to watch what you are eating and make sure you are having a balanced meal.

 

Junior Kaitlyn Lauck shares that, “the key is moderation and choosing your carbs and sweets carefully. Using a smaller plate helps me make sure I don’t pile too much onto my plate. I also make sure to eat slowly and drink water while I am eating.”

 

When it comes to filling up your plate this Thanksgiving, consider filling the majority of your plate with protein and vegetables before adding the stuffing, mashed potatoes, and gravy, which are full of carbohydrates. According to Real Simple, about half of your plate should be vegetables and the other half should be split between turkey or an alternative protein, and sides, such as stuffing and mashed potatoes.    

 

Even if you are trying to watch what you are eating, you can still indulge in Thanksgiving dessert. When it comes to pie, the average slice of pumpkin pie has about 40 fewer calories than pecan pie and just because you take a slice, it does not mean you have to eat it all.

 

Junior Jocelyn Rupp says, “I have a couple of bites of dessert to get enough of a sweet taste, but I don’t want to eat too much. I usually work out the next day to feel like I worked off all the food I ate at dinner.”

 

Whether or not you chose to have less of your favorite side dish or cut back on dessert this Thanksgiving, it is always a good idea to be aware of the calories and ingredients you consume. But please, do not let the Thanksgiving season prevent you from living a happy and healthy lifestyle.

 

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